You have reached the website of Rob Mimpriss, the short-story writer. Read reviews and samples of my books, contact me to organise an event, or learn how my writing has been shaped by the artistic and intellectual heritage of Wales.

News from Rob Mimpriss (2016)



I have realised that if ever I am to gloat over the disfigured corpses of my enemies, I am going to need a bigger cat.



‘There is now a profound divide — what British politicians call “deep blue water” — between Remain’s growing constituency and Leave’s diminishing one. This will be the defining split in British politics for at least a generation. And yet the vast majority of practicing politicians are on the declining side of this divide, where the supply of leaders far exceeds demand for them.

‘The UK is approaching a fundamental political realignment, for which the current government is totally unprepared. It will come — probably quite suddenly — as soon as enough people recognize that May has, through little fault of her own, inevitably failed to “get the best deal for Britain.” As the economist Herbert Stein famously observed, “If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.” So May’s government might last until May, but not much longer.’

Jacek Rostowski, former Deputy Prime Minister of Poland, analysing Theresa May’s predicament in Project Syndicate.



Picture of a Welsh Not

‘To many commentators, the curse of Wales was its distinctiveness — the fact that it was not English, linguistically and otherwise. That distinctiveness, it was argued, lay at the root of the Welsh readiness to riot, a readiness much exhibited between 1839 and 1844. The Welsh language was the quintessence of the distinctiveness... It was the existence of the Welsh language, argued the Rebecca Commission in 1844, that hindered the Law and the Established Church from civilising the Welsh. The attacks upon the language were interwoven with the racism which was rampant in nineteenth-century Europe.’

John Davies, The History of Wales (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1990).



Cover of My People Cover of Capel Sion Cover of My Neighbours

‘Our God is a big man: a tall man much higher than the highest chapel in Wales and broader than the broadest chapel. For the promised day that He comes to deliver us a sermon we shall have made a hole in the roof and taken down a wall. Our God has a long, white beard, and he is not unlike the Father Christmas of picture-books. Often he lies on his stomach on Heaven’s floor, an eye at one of his myriads of peepholes, watching that we keep his laws. Our God wears a frock coat, a starched linen collar and black necktie, and a silk hat, and on the Sabbath he preaches to the congregation of Heaven.’

These short stories depict the poverty and hardship endured by the peasants of west Wales at the turn of the Twentieth Century. But they also reveal the meanness and cruelty of lives lived in ignorance, caught between the desire for love and the fear of violence, and oppressed by the dark power of the chapel minister and the idol he represents. First published to great outrage and great acclaim, and now republished as modern classics by Cockatrice Books, they retain their timeless quality as classics and their power to shock.



10th December: To mark Human Rights Day, on which the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, I quote Kate Roberts, reflecting on nationhood, colonialism and the creative process in Wales at the time of the First World War:

‘I’m a thin-skinned woman, easily hurt, and by nature a terrible pacifist. My bristles are raised at once against anything I consider an injustice, be it against an individual or a society or a nation. Indeed, I’d like to have some great stage to stand on, facing Pumlumon, to be able to shout against every injustice — like the terrible injustice I personally felt, that the government took the children of monoglot Welsh cottagers to fight the wars of the Empire, and sent official letters to say that those children had been killed, in a language the parents couldn't read. But some instinct told me that the short story wasn’t a soap box to stand on, and that I’d have to discipline myself strictly as a living human being, and as a writer trying to write, to stop myself getting bitter against everyone and everything. And the same reviewer says, ‘You don’t find one line with any hint of bitterness in her work.’ And another said they have no feelings of anger, ill-feeling, pride, self-pity or rage. Of course it’s no compliment that those elements are not to be found, because they can be read into some of the characters. But I want to say that the absence of these feelings from my stories doesn’t reflect my character. The things inside me are totally different, and I have allowed them into many of my stories. But it was a hard struggle; I had to fight like the Devil himself to curb my emotions, and to bring my characters to the same place of quietness.’

Read on



5th December 2016: Click to read an open letter to Theresa May concerning continued funding for the Cornish language.



‘It’s not just that the public voted to Leave, or even the arrogance or condescension of Brexit politicians towards their European counterparts. It’s the fact that what they say literally makes no sense. It has no factual underpinning. It is logically impossible and intellectually worthless.

‘This would be disappointing and embarrassing at the best of times. But these are not the best of times. Britain is about to enter possibly the most complicated negotiations in its history, with very severe implications for our quality of life and our place in the world. These negotiations will not be conducted in the post-truth world of the Brexiters. They will be conducted on the basis of cold, hard facts.’

Ian Dunt, in The New European



There are times when I mourn the passing of the gas chamber — a tweet by @UkipArfon

UKIP Arfon, vile beyond description...



Following the very warm reception of Dangerous Asylums: Stories from Denbigh Mental Hospital in Denbigh itself, Nigel Jarrett gives the book a very warm reception in Wales Arts Review.



Speakers and guests at the Carriageworks, Denbigh, 4th November

4th November 2016: Tea and cake, two songs by Elaine Walker, readings by the contributors, and a supportive and deeply appreciative audience marked a celebration of Dangerous Asylums, an anthology of stories from Denbigh Mental Hospital, in Denbigh itself. The anthology, for sale on Amazon and Gwales, has garnered its first customer review, and by agreement of the contributors, all profits will support the work of MIND.



Poster for Dangerous Asylums reading in Denbigh


READING AND DISCUSSION
Friday 4th November
6pm, The Carriageworks, Denbigh

Dangerous Asylums: Stories from Denbigh Mental Hospital Told by Leading Welsh Writers

Glenda Beagan, Carys Bray, A. L. Reynolds, Manon Steffan Ros, Simon Thirsk, Elaine Walker, Gee and David Williams.
Contributing editor: Rob Mimpriss

Published by North Wales Mental Health Research Project, Department of Psychological Medicine, Hergest Unit, Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor

‘In this exemplary collaboration between medical science and imagination, lives preserved in official records, in the language and diagnoses of their times, are restored not just to light, but to humanity and equality. This anthology is a resurrection.’ Philip Gross.



Image of watch which stopped at time of Aberfan disaster

21st October: On this day, 1966, a slagheap engulfed the primary school and part of the village of Aberfan, Merthyr Tydfil, killing 116 children and 28 adults.

The collapse was caused by a build-up water in the shale, which was allowed by the National Coal Board to build up on the side of a limestone ridge above the village, containing water sources. Three years before the incident, Merthyr Tydfil Council wrote to the National Coal Board to express concern at the safety of the tip; in 1965, a petition signed by parents was presented to the school. The Davies Enquiry commissioned by the Secretary of State for Wales blamed the negligence of the National Coal Board and the mendacity of its chairman, Lord Robens.

The NCB paid out £160,000 in compensation, including £500 per fatality, while donations from the public received by Merthyr Tydfil council came to more than £1.6 million. The Charities Commission intervened to prevent payments to individual victims from the disaster fund, while government pressure forced the fund to contribute to the cost of removing remaining slag heaps.

Wales marked the fiftieth anniversary of the disaster with a moment of silence at 9:15am. The Wales Powers Bill of 2016 offers the National Assembly limited sovereignty over energy production in Wales.



‘They love Britain, not because it is Britain, but because it is strong.’ Gwynfor Evans, Land of My Fathers (1974).



‘Folly is a more dangerous enemy to the good than malice. You can protest against malice, you can unmask it or prevent it by force. Malice always contains the seeds of its own destruction, for it always makes men uncomfortable, if nothing worse. There is no defence against folly. Neither protests nor force are of any avail against it, and it is never amenable to reason. If facts contradict personal prejudices, there is no need to believe them, and if they are undeniable, they can simply be pushed aside as exceptions. Thus the fool, as compared with the scoundrel, is invariably self-complacent. And he can easily become dangerous, for it does not take much to make him aggressive. Hence folly requires much more cautious handling than malice. We shall never again try to reason with the fool, for it is both useless and dangerous.


‘To deal adequately with folly it is essential to recognize it for what it is. This much is certain, it is a moral rather than an intellectual defect. There are men of great intellect who are fools, and men of low intellect who are anything but fools, a discovery we make to our surprise as a result of particular circumstances. The impression we derive is that folly is acquired rather than congenital; it is acquired in certain circumstances where men make fools of themselves or allow others to make fools of them. We observe further that folly is less common in the unsociable or the solitary than in individuals or groups who are inclined or condemned to sociability. From this it would appear that folly is a sociological problem rather than one of psychology. It is a special form of the operation of historical circumstances upon men, a psychological by-product of definite external factors. On closer inspection it would seem that any violent revolution, whether political or religious, produces an outburst of folly in a large part of mankind. Indeed, it would seem to be almost a law of psychology and sociology. The power of one needs the folly of the other. It is not that certain aptitudes of men, intellectual aptitudes for instance, become stunted or destroyed. Rather, the upsurge of power is so terrific that it deprives men of an independent judgement, and they give up trying—more or less unconsciously—to assess the new state of affairs for themselves. The fool can often be stubborn, but this must not mislead us into thinking he is independent. One feels, somehow, especially in conversation with him, that it is impossible to talk to the man himself, to talk to him personally. Instead, one is confronted with a series of slogans, watchwords, and the like, which have acquired power over him. He is under a curse, he is blinded, his very humanity is being prostituted and exploited.'

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison. trans. by Eberhard Bethge.



While I am delighted for Bob Dylan, it is important that the Nobel Prize for Literature not forsake its primary purpose, which is to annoy the Americans.



‘Imagine in Remain had won by a tiny margin, and the government went for “Hard Remain” — Schengen, the Euro, multilingual signage. People would go apeshit.’

Rhiannon Lucy Coslett on Twitter @rhiannonlucyc



Photograph of hitman, the Baptist, in the film, Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels

And in other news, as the European Parliament appoints Conservative MEP, Sajjad Karim, to investigate the cause of Steven Woolfe’s injuries, news leaks that UKIP’s internal investigation will be conducted by a mysterious figure known only as ‘The Baptist.’

And elsewhere, a BBC internal email accidentally copied to a journalist states that the altercation between Steven Woolfe and Mike ‘Knuckles’ Hookem should be referred to in the news as a ‘gentlemen’s disagreement.’



The stench of racism emanating from Birmingham can’t be ignored. Amongst the Brexit jam jokes and the clown Boris adulation there’s the whiff of Weimar. It has a long history: of failed empire, self-entitlement, presumption of place in the world and discomfort at status decline.

Mike Small, ‘Brexit Means Racism.’ Bella Caledonia (5th October 2016)



A statement from the leaders of Plaid Cymru, the SNP, and the Greens, addresses the current social and political crisis:

The countries of the United Kingdom face a spiralling political and economic crisis. At the top of the Conservative Party, the narrow vote in favour of leaving the EU has now been interpreted as the pretext for a drastic cutting of ties with Europe, which would have dire economic results - and as an excuse for the most toxic rhetoric on immigration we have seen from any government in living memory.


This is a profoundly moral question which gets to the heart of what sort of country we think we live in. We will not tolerate the contribution of people from overseas to our NHS being called into question, or a new version of the divisive rhetoric of 'British jobs for British workers'. Neither will we allow the people of these islands, no matter how they voted on June 23rd, to be presented as a reactionary, xenophobic mass whose only concern is somehow taking the UK back to a lost imperial age. At a time of increasing violence and tension, we will call out the actions of politicians who threaten to enflame those same things.

This is not a time for parties to play games, or meekly respect the tired convention whereby they do not break cover during each other's conferences. It is an occasion for us to restate the importance of working together to resist the Tories' toxic politics, and make the case for a better future for our people and communities. We will do this by continuing to work and campaign with the fierce sense of urgency this political moment demands.

Signed by:
Leanne Wood, Leader of Plaid Cymru
Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister of Scotland
Jonathan Bartley, co-leader of the Green Party of England and Wales
Caroline Lucas, co-leader of the Green Party of England and Wales
Steven Agnew, Leader of the Green Party of Northern Ireland
Patrick Harvie, Co-convener of the Scottish Green Party
Alice Hooker-Stroud, Leader of the Wales Green Party

Source



Poster for book launch of Dangerous Asylums

BOOK LAUNCH AND REFRESHMENTS
Monday 10th October, World Mental Health Day
5-6pm,Lecturer Room 2, Main Arts Building.
Free entry

Dangerous Asylums: Stories from Denbigh Mental Hospital Told by Leading Welsh Writers

Glenda Beagan, Carys Bray, A. L. Reynolds, Manon Steffan Ros, Simon Thirsk, Elaine Walker, Gee and David Williams.
Contributing editor: Rob Mimpriss

Published by North Wales Mental Health Research Project, Department of Psychological Medicine, Hergest Unit, Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor

‘In this exemplary collaboration between medical science and imagination, lives preserved in official records, in the language and diagnoses of their times, are restored not just to light, but to humanity and equality. This anthology is a resurrection.’ Philip Gross.



An old man once sat under an olive tree outside a city gate, when a traveller approached him asked him what kind of people lived within. ‘And what kind of people have you come from?’ asked the old man. ‘Oh,’ replied the traveller, ‘they were without exception churlish and rude, and that is why I had to leave.’ ‘Then I am sorry,’ said the old man, ‘but you will find the people here no different.’

The traveller went his way, but another traveller approached, and asked the old man what kind of city he had arrived at. ‘And what kind of city have you left?’ asked the old man. ‘I miss it,’ replied the traveller, 'for it was filled with the most noble and hospitable people that a mortal man could know.’ ‘Then I think you will find,’ replied the old man, ‘that the people here are every bit as worthy.’ ~Aesop.



I missed this story at the time. But apparently Theresa May advised George Osborne, ‘as an older sister,’ to acquire a soul by starving a child to death in a silver cage.



A small but troubling indicator of the growth of English nationalism: The Telegraph reports that Tesco are removing the Welsh and Scottish flags from food packaging because customers in England are complaining.



And a Brexiteer says in the Guardian comments that experts make up 99% of their statistics.



The ghettoisation of the Welsh: This article in The Economic Voice considers house pricing and immigration from England in the light of centuries of English colonialism, and considers what can be done to preserve Wales’s ailing culture.



Wales, already impoverished, is set to get even poorer: This article by Daniel Evans, published by the London School of Economics, considers why Wales voted to leave the E.U., what that vote says about its public discourse and national life, and what harm the leave vote will do to its economy.



According to the Institute of Race Relations, as reported in The Independent, a quarter of racial hate crimes recorded since 23rd June specifically feature the words ‘Go home!’ or ‘Leave!’ — for which they blame Theresa May in person, and her mobile advertisements telling people to ‘Go home or face arrest’ during her time as Home Secretary.



This interview to be published in New Left Review comments, among other things, on the difference between hard nationalism and the national politics of stateless nations, on why Britain has never become federal, and why left-wingers constantly vilify and misrepresent Celtic nationalisms.



According to a British Election study reported by the BBC, views on capital punishment and public whipping were a significantly better predictor of Euroscepticism than class or income.



Mr Terry Nathan, UKIP councillor in Bromley, stressing the need to kill people who repudiate his views.



In a YouGov poll running from 30th June — 4th July commissioned by the Wales Governance Centre, 53% percent of Welsh respondents now favour remaining in the E.U.

Link



‘So why are you here?’
‘Oh, just a check-up and polish.’
‘Hmm... Any Heat magazines behind the back?‘

~Llŷr ap Gareth



‘The number of learners is increasing, and the public sentiment toward the language is more positive than it has been in more than a century. That’s the perception anyway. The reality is that Welsh is still very much a vulnerable language, and if some major social changes don’t take place in the next generation or two, at most, it will not survive as a truly living community language; it will find itself in the unenviable position that Irish finds itself in today, or worse.’

Robert J Jones, analysing the language’s prospects in The Pianosa Chronicle



12th July 2016: Remember when David Cameron told the Scottish government that Scotland was either in or out, and couldn’t just cherry-pick the best bits of union? That.



11th July 2016: Leave voters, controlled for age and education, were more likely to use block capitals than those who voted remain. Tweeted by @caprosser.





k thx bye, says EU.



As Plaid Cymru celebrates the solidarity of stateless nations across Europe, a cogent article on the costs of leaving appears on the London School of Economics website, and a poll of economists by Ipsos MORI shows overwhelming expert opposition to Brexit.



On the left, a Nazi propoganda film. On the right, a poster campaign by UKIP. Shared by
Johnny Marr
.



11th June 2016: England fans shout ‘Fuck off, Europe; we're voting out’ during violent clashes in Marseille. The mask of Brexit slips to reveal an ugly, racist English nationalism.



Two short story collections from the Egyptian Nobel laureate, Naguib Mahfouz: in Voices from the Past, the deeds of ancient Pharoahs and sages are told in simple, compelling, fables. In The Time and the Place, modern Cairo comes to vivid and crowded life in brilliantly focused and compelling modernist short stories.



Martin Buber tells the story of a mystic who, after a long and arduous journey of the soul, finally knocks on the gates of heaven, and is asked by a voice from within what he wants. He replies, ‘I am a man of prayer. I have sought God all my life, and now I am here, I wish to speak with him.’ ‘Then go back!’ says the voice. ‘Your God is not here, for He has drowned Himself in the hearts of men.’



Two Italian fabulists: Anna Maria Ortese, whose stories set in rented rooms and phantasmagorically vast apartments, map out the richness and complexity of the inner life; and Giorgio Manganelli, in whose work the monologue of a labyrinth suggests the mystery of self-consciousness, and an unbodied soul prepares itself for the trauma of human birth.



27th April 2016:

Dear Mr Cameron

To claim that during the junior doctors’ strike in England yesterday the Welsh border became ‘a line between life and death’ would be both graceless and mendacious. I will therefore refrain from doing so.

Yours sincerely

Rob Mimpriss



26th April 2016: The day the Abolish the Welsh Assembly Party drop a flyer through my door, asking what the Assembly has ever done for Wales, is the day junior doctors in England walk out of routine and emergency care, while services in Wales continue as normal.



Two classics of Welsh religious prose from Cockatrice Books.

Morgan Llwyd (1619-1659), the nephew of a professional soldier and magician, was a Roundhead, a millenialist, a chaplain in the army of Oliver Cromwell, and later a civil servant of the commonwealth in Wales. His Welsh-language writings, grounded in Puritan theology, yet enriched by his mysticism and esotericism, are considered masterpieces of imagery and cadence, among the best prose ever written in Welsh. His three English-language essays, first published in 1655 and collected in Lazarus and His Sisters, display the depth and richness of his religious thought, and his passionate engagement in the tumultuous events of his day.

The Sleeping Bard of Ellis Wynne’s great prose poem is dragged from sleep by the fairies of Welsh myth, and rescued by an angel is taken to see the City of Destruction, whose citizens vie for the favour of Belial’s three beautiful daughters; to the realm of King Death, the rebellious vassal of Lucifer; and finally to Hell itself, where Lucifer debates with his demons which sin shall rule Great Britain.

First published in 1703, this classic of religious allegory and Welsh prose combines all the blunt urgency of John Bunyan with the vivid social satire of Dryden and Pope, and is published in the Robert Gwyneddon Davies translation of 1909.



11th April 2016: Meet Russ Gluteus Sims, listed on his Facebook profile as responsible for Public Relations at UKIP. It has been humbling and enlightening to watch British Unionists adapt themselves to the devolution age. Yet another instance of UKIP charm.



The short-story writer and poet, Nigel Jarrett, winner of the Rhys Davies Award, publishes his third book with G.G. Books, the novel, Slowly Burning. It is available for sale here.



2nd April 2016: According to the 9th century Welsh monk, Nennius, the legendary British king, Gwrtheyrn or Vortigern, was killed in his castle by fire from heaven after the monks of Britain prayed against him for three days and three nights. The calumnies which earned their condemnation included his marriage to one of the godless Saxons, and his ‘unnatural relations’ with his own daughter. It is not made explicit in Nennius’s account which sin was considered the worse.



Russian short-story writers: Tatyana Tolstaya (1951-), whose carefully wrought, vivid and sensitive accounts of disappointment and loss are somehow always uplifting; and Lyudmila Petrushevskaya (1938-), heiress of Gogol, quietly revealing the tragedies of seemingly unremarkable lives. What the Russian short-story writers have been up to...



Steinbeck, Forster and the Nobel Prize

Papers relating to the Nobel Prize released at the start of this year contained a number of revelations. In 1961, J.R.R. Tolkein was passed over on the grounds of poor prose and narrative technique, and E.M. Forster, whose last novel, A Passage to India, was published in 1924, was rejected because he was old, ‘a shadow of his former self.’ Ivo Andrić won the prize that year, and in 1962, John Steinbeck was selected over Robert Graves.

Graves was rendered ineligible because he was a poet, because it would be inappropriate to award an English poet while Ezra Pound was still alive, and because Pound was ruled out because of his war-time support for Nazism. But Steinbeck was a compromise candidate. Despite his social conscience, and the monumental nature of books like Of Mice and Men (1937), The Grapes of Wrath (1939), and East of Eden (1952), his work was marred by his ‘tenth-rate philosophising.’

At first glance there is little in common between Forster’s tight studies of upper class manners, and Steinbeck’s sprawling eulogies of working men...

Read on



The Wrestlers

Light strained through cigarette smoke became silver and granular; cast ridges of darkness on the knitted furrows of Gail’s top, on Chloë’s skirt of ruched velvet; glinted heavily on Calvin’s ring, Jason’s glass. The group’s rapt inwardness, the murmur of their voices, the stillness of that stone-faced man and the tear-swollen cheeks of the blonde, created a circle around them which no one transgressed. Only, in the foreground, a tattooed hand raising a pint glass to yellow lips would obtrude itself, or a barman come near to take their glasses, but turn away. The crowd thickened. A property developer watched the young farmer sitting beside him, examining street plans, and saw that his hands were still pink and clean. A girl in high heels slumped against the wall, breathing heavily, and saw the intent look on her companion’s face before he split into dizzying twins. The developer read the birth of his fortune in those hands; the girl would allege rape, but would not be believed...

Read the story



The human sacrifice scene in Apocalypto. It’s great to see women playing a leading role in public worship.



House of Fools

It must have been the professor’s death that upset her, for want of any substantial cause. She read his wife’s email during the hour before her last class; her lips tightened when she realised what it contained, and she pushed back her chair, getting up to stand in the window overlooking the quadrangle. The nearby hills were capped with cloud; the autumn day was drawing to an end, and it was going to rain. Two of her students were playing the fool, giving piggy-back rides near the Head of Department’s car, and she opened the window and called down to them, ‘You two! Get away from there!’ They ignored her. The students in the warmth of the reading room sighed over their computers. Mallt shut the window before her attic room lost its heat, and let herself sink down in one of the chairs she had set out for her students.

It was not that she and Herbert had been close since he took the chair at Oxford. She had seen him at the launch of his festschrift two years before, and had spent a few minutes near the wine glasses chatting with his wife. He had refilled his glass enough times to draw notice. And Mallt, who had never married or had children, whose flesh was sinking into the bones, had flattered herself that an onlooker might see in her face the fruit of dedication and uprightness and work, and in his the rotten leavings of a talent.

Read on



How Writers Learn

In Crefft y Stori Fer (1949), a classic of short-story criticism containing an interview with Kate Roberts, among others, the modernist John Gwilym Jones explains how he studied the art of writing. There were few previous modernists in Welsh, but he took sentences from the writers of the Welsh prose cannon — Morgan Llwyd, Ellis Wynne, the Mabinogion — and copied them, changing content and details, but leaving the syntax and rhythm intact. Through imitation, he hoped to discover his own artistic voice.

Exactly the same exercise is offered by John Gardner, in his book, The Art of Fiction (1983), which is filled with challenges to the writer to work hard, to master technique, to be scrupulous in pursuit of the perfect paragraph, the perfect sentence. Though John Gwilym Jones’s stories first struck me as dull and dry, I cannot forget them, and I often return to them. They have been translated by Meic Stephens under the title, The Plum Tree, published by Seren.



26th February 2016: Half of UKIP voters admitted racial prejudice in a poll conducted by YouGov, according to this article published by The Independent last year.



Lot

New Welsh Review 13

The room was in darkness. Only the light from the hall leaked under the door. The door opened a little, and Lewis reached through the opening, fumbling for the light switch. He found the switch, and let the door swing open. ‘This is the living room,’ he said.

The viewer looked over Lewis’s shoulder. He was a younger man than Lewis, and more smartly dressed. He looked at the gaudy catalogue furnishings of the room, the fireplace, which was dead, the door to the kitchen and the flight of stairs. ‘Can I look round?’ he said.

Read on



This year
2016 2015 2014 2013

I am the author of three short story collections. Reasoning and For His Warriors, originally published by Gwasg y Bwthyn, Caernarfon, with Welsh Books Council support, now join Prayer at the End in revised editions at Cockatrice Books. My anthology of fiction, Dangerous Asylums: Stories from Denbigh Mental Hospital Told by Leading Welsh Writers, including work by Gee and David Williams, Glenda Beagan, Carys Bray, Simon Thirsk and others, was published by the North Wales Mental Health Research Project, October 2016.

I am the translator of Going South: The Stories of Richard Hughes Williams (Cockatrice, 2015), Hallowe’en in the Cwm: The Stories of Glasynys (Cockatrice, forthcoming), and A Book of Three Birds, the seventeenth-century classic by Morgan Llwyd (Cockatrice, forthcoming). In addition, I have translated fiction by D. Gwenallt Jones, Angharad Tomos, and Manon Steffan Ros.