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News from Rob Mimpriss (2017)



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Some facts about Welsh independence, posted by Yantorbo Rob on Youtube.

Three articles also make the economic case for Welsh independence. One, by former Member of Parliament, Adam Price, in Huffington Post, explores the greater flexibility that smaller economies have over large, and a second, by Adam Price in Wales Online, suggests how an independent Wales can address its budget deficit; the third, by Gwynfor Evans, and recently republished by Bella Gwalia, argues that an independent Wales would adapt its economy to serve the needs of its people, and studies the objections that prevent that case from being made. Mike Hedges A.M. argues that Welsh independence would be less risky than Brexit, since its terms could be negotiated prior to a referendum, and a series of articles on State of Wales explore Wales’s currency options as an independent state.

Meanwhile, an article by John Dixon politely destroys the false dichotomy set by Carwyn Jones between the head and the heart, while warning us that Welsh democracy cannot be safeguarded within the British state; Adam Price reminds us of Wales’s status as an English colony; an article for the London School of Economics comments on the recent growth of the independence movement, an article in Nation.Cymru argues that Plaid Cymru can only compete for votes or serve Wales if it pursues independence as a matter of urgency, and another reports on a YouGov poll that puts support for independence at over 25%.



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Click to read a short story for August: ‘Hamilton Park.’ A Turkish Cypriot in Cardiff Bay seeks friendship with the teenagers outside his shop. Shortlisted for the Rhys Davies Award and published in Prayer at the End: Twenty-Three Stories.



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The last few chapters of Hannah Arendt’s book, The Origins of Totalitarianism, yield ideas of value to us in Wales. First, Arendt emphasises the relationship between civil liberty and the nation state, such that the emergent Republic of France proclaimed the Rights of Man and gave equal status to its Jewish population, because the nation state bases its authority on its right to treat all citizens as equals, regardless of ethnicity or creed. Hence, nationalism is by nature civic nationalism, and to apply the term ‘nationalism’ to the racist and imperialist movements of the last century is either to misunderstand the phenomenon, or to abuse the word.

But while the nation state, says Arendt, treats all its citizens alike, it also seeks the uniformity of a single national language and culture, and cannot tolerate indigenous minorities within its borders: it seeks to destroy the Slovenes in Hungary, the Germans in Romania, either through assimilation, or through genocide. Unconsciously, Arendt echoes the language of Matthew Arnold, supporting the decision of the UK parliament deliberately and utterly to annihilate Welsh culture as a means of destroying the will of the Welsh people to rule themselves, and to better themselves — the unhappy effects of which we still suffer in our impoverished and divided country. Hence, to speak, as Rhodri Morgan spoke, of Wales as a nation and of Britain as a nation, of being both Welsh and British with disadvantage to neither, to imagine a future for Wales in Britain which is more than a cultural, social and economic slow suicide, would be, in Arendt’s view, a terrible political mistake: Wales’s act of national stupidity — Wales’s Brexit.



According to The Independent, survivors of the Grenfell fire are being invited to ‘bid’ for accommodation. Words can no longer express my anger at the Tories, their inhumanity, greed and hypocrisy; my hatred, my contempt, my disgust.



A screen shot of hate mail sent to Leanne Wood

19th August 2017: A screenshot of hate mail sent to Leanne Wood



Reports of a book burning organised by American Nazis, to protect their country and the kiddiewinks from such degerate ideas as democracy, liberalism, and Islam, made me remember a short story by Italo Calvino, which these Nazis would no doubt wish to burn. In ‘The General in the Library’ an officer is set the task of purging his national literature, but taking his commission seriously, decides that he and his troops should carefully read the contents of their national library, and only destroy what they know to be wanting. The task proves endless: no book can be read except in the light of at least one other, and many of the books seem to have more than one possible interpretation. He and his soldiers are still busy studying, when the political motive for the book burning is dropped. And likewise, it seems, the American Nazis cancelled their auto da fé out of fear of caring people.



There is simply no point. There is no argument that will be understood, no evidence that will be accepted. One might as usefully argue existentialism with a two-year-old child, pacifism with an axe-murderer, abstinence with a violent drunk. They won, and you are a traitor, and facts are irrelevant, so there. They guarantee themselves an eternal vindication, by the simple expedient of ignoring the fact that they have already lost.



If Welsh-speakers are bilingual, than bilingual policy is an extravagance; if they are not proficient in English, then it is a hindrance. If the Welsh language is healthy, then it does not need official protection; if it is moribund, it does not deserve it. These are the rationalisations of those who the language dead, the Welsh people forgotten, and who will use any argument, no matter how groundless, to make that demand seem reasonable, says Dylan Llŷr, writing for nation.cymru.



A modest proposal from a friend:

‘I read that the estimated cost of the Brexit “divorce bill” is likely to be in the order of £1000 for every UK taxpayer, and I see quite a number of people saying they don’t mind being poorer, as it’s about the sovereignty. I think I have hit upon a brilliant idea that will satisfy everyone. We have another referendum, and everyone who votes Leave has to attach to their ballot paper a cheque for £2000 made out to HMG. That should about cover it if Leave wins, and if the referendum votes Remain, the cheques are not cashed. Genius or what?’



People on the BBC Wales Facebook page are gloating because they think the change from a Welsh-language Commissioner to a Welsh-language Commission means that Welsh will lose its official status. They are gloating because they think this.

You cannot have a temperate discussion about who should deliver official Welsh-language status, because the trolls turn up and say that Welsh shouldn’t have any official status. You cannot have a temperate discussion about how to teach Welsh in schools, because the trolls turn up and say that they don’t want their darling kiddiewinks learning Welsh in school. You cannot have a temperate discussion about any policy or law agreed by the Senedd, because the trolls turn up and demand the abolition of the Senedd. Every conversation concerning Wales takes place against the background of this hateful, ignorant, racist clamour.



This petition calling for an investigation of how the BBC portrays the Welsh language, follows an item on Newsnight about whether the Welsh language harms Wales. Their witness for the prosecution was, of all people, Julian Ruck.



If Wales had remained uncolonised and independent, and if it were now offered membership of the United Kingdom, on condition that it give up its language and culture, its natural resources, and all but a shadow of self-government and democracy, would you vote for Wales to join?



I presented agricultural proverbs as recorded by the great scholar and poet, Iolo Morgannwg (1747-1826), with my own translations:

Tri pheth a gynnydd yn y glaw:
Gwlydd ac ysgall ac ysgaw.

Three things thrive in rainy weather:
Weeds and thistles and the elder.

Gwell gweled dodi’th fam i’r esgor
Na gweled hinon teg yn Ionor.

Better to see your mother buried
Than see the passing of Winter hurried.



Image of the proposed Iron Ring outside Flint Castle

While it has been said that the #ringofshame was a work of art crushed by the anger of a mob, it might also be said that anger is the poor man’s rejection slip.

When a work of art offends the weak because it is historically inappropriate or culturally insensitive, they shout, and accuse, and demand that it be halted. But when a work of art offends the strong, they ignore it, and it dies. They do not explain the motives behind their decision. They do not even state that there has been a decision.



Two short stories by the seminal Welsh novelist Daniel Owen, translated and published on site: Daniel Owen (1836-1895), the son of a collier killed in a mining accident, and the apprentice of a draper and Methodist elder, became a poet and short-story writer, and one of the first and greatest of Welsh-language novelists. His Fireside Stories were first published in 1895. Both the stories translated for this site demonstrate Daniel Owen’s fascination with human goodness, with the crushing effects of chapel discipline, and with the destructive power of slander. Read here.



According to a report by Credit Suisse, Brexit cost UK householders £1.2tn in the twelve months following the EU referendum, says an article in The Independent. Meanwhile, economics Prof. David Blanchfower, former member of the Bank of England’s monetary policy committee, describes the UK as becoming ‘the sick man of Europe’ in his article for The Guardian.



Regional inequality in the UK is rivalled only by Mexico, making England one of the richest, and Wales one of the poorest countries in Europe.



Photograph of landscape with Milky Way

The Story of Rhitta the Giant: A mediaeval tale of wars, giants, stars, beards and the need for European unity, taken from the 1862 anthology, Cymru Fu, and translated by Rob Mimpriss here.



‘A part of me thinks, why bother - it’s gone. But as it may be just the beginning, it seems worth reiterating some points about the Times editorial. This was another classic example of historical English-British prejudice and fallacy dressed up in rational liberal discourse.

‘Telling a people to restrict the teaching of their language is to tell them their culture is inferior, not worthy of the effort. This is bigotry for which the most adequate word we have is racism.’ Huw Williams at nation.cymru.



Article in The Times newspaper attacking Welsh-language education

Image from The Times newspaper taken from Nation.Cymru

We’re not being racist, because the Welsh language isn’t a race, say racists. Meanwhile a far more thoughtful, better informed reflection on the Cymraeg 2050 project by Roger Scully appears in New Statesman.



Twelve months after the EU referendum: Michael Heseltine says that Brexit is not feasible because global structures no longer favour completely independent nation states; Chris Patten describes Brexit as a mess which has rendered the UK ungovernable; and Gisela Stuart and Dominic Cummings, leaders of the Brexit campaign, describes the referendum and its result as a folly; and a new poll from Survation suggests that more Britons wish to remain in the E.U. than voted to leave it.



Those for whom the word ‘Welsh nationalist’ automatically carries connotations of militarism, racism, and the hysterical love of the nation state might consider the following passage by Amos Oz (In the Land of Israel. 1983. Trans. by Maurie Goldberg-Bartura):

‘This is the place to make my first shocking confession — others will follow. I think that the nation state is a tool, an instrument, that is necessary for a return to Zion, but I am not enamoured of this instrument. The idea of the nation state is, in my eyes, “goyim naches” -- a gentiles’ delight. I would be more than happy to live in a world composed of dozens of civilisations, each developing in accordance with its own internal rhythm, all cross-pollinating one another, without any one emerging as a nation state: no flag, no emblem, no passport, no anthem. No nothing. Only spiritual civilisations tied somehow to their lands, without the tools of statehood, and without the instruments of war.

‘But the Jewish people has already staged a long-running one-man show of that sort. The international audience sometimes applauded, sometimes threw stones, and occasionally slaughtered the actor. No one joined us; no one copied the model the Jews were forced to sustain for two thousand years, the model of a civilisation without “the tools of statehood.” For me this drama ended with the murder of Europe’s Jews by Hitler. And I am forced to take it upon myself to play the “game of nations,” with all the tools of statehood, even though it causes me to feel (as George Steiner put it) like an old man in a kindergarten.’



‘Not sure what’s more upsetting: the shite Guardian article [attacking Welsh-language education as politically-motivated child abuse], the foulness it provokes, or the hurt and exhaustion of maligned Welsh speakers.’ Jasmine Donahaye.



In advance of my translation of Morgan Llwyd’s seminal religious allegory and political dialogue, A Book of Three Birds, I present two of his shorter Welsh-language tracts, written in the years 1653 and 1655, during the period of Oliver Cromwell’s Commonwealth. They depict a kingdom embittered and divided by war, and faced with an uncertain future as the time of the Second Coming of Jesus, fervently awaited by Morgan Llwyd, approaches:

A Cry in Wales Against Every Conscience

O People of Wales! To you I lift my voice; O Dwellers of Gwynedd and the South, to you I cry. Dawn has broken, and the sun is rising upon you. The birds are singing: awake, oh Welshman, awake; and if you will not believe words, believe deeds. Look about you and see – behold, the world and its pillars are shaking. The earth is in tumult; thunder and lightning are in the minds of the peoples. Behold, the hearts of many are quaking (because they have not confessed) to look upon the things that are coming. The great day of the Lord is searching and testing every secret thought; many are seeking a place to hide in the thickets of the self, and under the aprons of the old Adam; the wise have lost their senses, and the strong can no longer stand; the eloquent swallow their words, and those who are crafty are biting their tongues; dear friends are accusing one other, and every close man is dividing within himself. The great houses are split in two, and the small houses are in splinters. The old churches fall, and the new are in confusion; Judas is selling his master, and Peter is denying him; many have come out of Egypt, but few are reaching Canaan, for to pass through the narrow gate, they must be as small as children. Now the secrets of the chambers are spoken on the streets, and words whispered in the ear are heard by all in public. The agitation of the peoples is as though the Princes of the Air (the Fallen Angels) have swarmed like gnats into this part of the world, and the forces of darkness are more active and fervent than before, since the time of their winter is at hand. The life and time of every man is running like a weaver’s shuttle, and the great eternal world is drawing close to all, and also to you who are reading or listening to this. For this reason it is high time for you to awake from your sleep, and to search for the narrow path, and to acknowledge the truth and to follow it carefully.

Read on

A Guide for the Welsh

Oh soul, where are you going? You do not know, any more than a man on a journey knows where he will lodge, and what company he will meet. As they say in Wales, he knows what has passed, not what is to come. But as for the soul, it does not see where it came from, or where it will go. This much is clear: the flesh goes to the grave and the earth, and the breath is scattered; the body is tested in the furnace of the grave; the soul chases after the spirit (which is the heart of the tree), and the spirit goes forever to the nature it coveted most. The body is merely a tool in the hand of the heavenly spirit. The soul is only a breath of the most secret spirit. The spirit is the wheel within, which turns the soul and the body where it will, as it can. The body is like the clothing which covers a man, the soul is like the body which is clothed in dust, but the spirit is the heart of the creature.

A man runs fell pelt through this life, and those who meet him ask, Where are the soul and the spirit going? What does it benefit a man to dance and go down to the bottomless pit in a momentary pleasure? Will not God punish you for stealing your heart from Him? And do you think Eternity short, or the earthly life of a man long? Is it better for you to suffer the thunderbolts of righteous wrath forever, and the mockery of devils (for living in sin like them), or to suffer the jeering of men for a brief moment here? Is God not the best of lovers, and the worst of enemies? Why do you feed your flesh to the starvation of your soul, and indulge your soul, or your fleshly reason, to the destruction of your spirit? A fly in your way stops you from doing good, yet the Angel of God cannot keep you from sin. Has not Christ done all for you? And do you not find it in your heart to do anything for Him? The only son of God agreed to give His heart’s blood, (in which was his very life), and everything for you. Will you not suffer anything for His sake, or at least for the sake of your own soul? Will you let go of the spiritual gold from your hand, to fill your hand and mind with filth? Will you forfeit eternal life for the sake of a few fleeting nothings? What, do you say, is less than nothing? The whole present world is less than nothing, as Isaiah says, before God. And do you fear, or do you care for, a thing which is less than nothing? Do you love the world and its lusts, which altogether are less than nothing, as holy scripture says? (For the world and its lusts are passing away, and the lust of the world is the pleasant spirit of nature in which you live.) Why will you not see, while there is still time, what will become of you when this world is burnt and brought to nought?

Read on



Taken from Nigel Farage’s Facebook page following the terrorist attack on Finsbury Park Mosque

We are not required to believe that Fascist movements can only come to power in an exact replay of the scenario of Hitler and Mussolini. All that is required to fit our model is polarisation, deadlock, mass-mobilisation against internal and external enemies, and complicity by existing elites. In the Balkans in the 1990s something that looks very much like Fascism was produced by a very different scenario, a change of course by leaders already in power.’ Robert O. Paxton, The Anatomy of Fascism.



Tweeted by Maya Goodfellow: Grenfell survivors will be considered ‘intentionally homeless’ and denied all aid if they insist on remaining in London. Some have been told to move as far as Preston.



Sharp scissors should be banned in schools, alcohol in prisons, and votes on foreign policy in the United Kingdom.



Mike Parker's fair-minded plea to Plaid Cymru to reconsider their election performance in the light of their aims, and to the LibDems to reconsider their election tactics in the light of their principles, published in the excellent nation.cymru.



Tweeted by @Liam O'Hare: Theresa May briefly visited Grenfell Tower, but refused to meet any residents.



Brexit Means Racism: And here, members of the pro-Brexit group, Brexit HQ, express their hatred and contempt for victims and survivors of the Grenfell Tower fire.



And as the UK drops to the bottom of the EU’s economic growth league, Theresa May promises to negotiate a good deal on the rope we’re using to hang ourselves.



11th June 2017: Tweeted by @AngrySalmond: Loyalists in Liverpool attack an Irish pub. DUP supporters carrying UVF flags.



My friend and colleague Sarah Hills Wright makes the following timely remarks on the purpose of fasting and the nature of mercy in Islam, and the Muslim community’s response to the atrocities in Manchester and London. They appeared on Facebook, and are reprinted by her kind permission:

So, I go to the allotment the other day and my poorly designed, expensive portable and rechargeable radio refuses to continue to find the channel I am after. No brainer for those that know me well enough which channel I am looking for. Anyway, it gets stuck and I end up half way through planting a butternut squash realising that I am listening to Radio Islam... err... what do I do? Turn it off and listen to the slugs munching the seedlings or just roll with it for a bit? So I do. Roll with it. They talk about eating disorders in Ramadan, they talk about healthy options for breaking the fast of an evening, you know, the obvious... too easy to reach for the deep fried stuff, try something a bit less calorific and healthy etc. Anyway, after a bit an Imam comes on, talking about Islam and how it relates to the rest of the world. He says if anyone needs to be afraid of their neighbour, that neighbour is not a Muslim. It is then I understand that the the true doctrine of most religions does not propagate violence, but that it is humans that do that, misguided humans who have found a comfortable concept to justify their meanness by wrongly interpreting a doctrine that is there to create peace.


So I think on and on and think that in all my efforts to be comprehensive and understand the world around me, I forget to look from the wider perspective. I forget to engage with the truth of the existence of others, and how it looks from where they stand. I learned so much from the serendipitous moment of a broken tuner: I learned that fasting is a challenge to find peace and constance even in the face of hunger and deprivation. I understand it is an opportunity to find balance in diet and need. I learned that exercising self-discipline for the greater good is universal. I learned that I had so much to learn.

Today by choice I tuned in to Radio Islam. It was mid afternoon and I was again in the process of organising nature around me. Deweeding the patio, trimming the rude infiltration of the ever growing grass. This time on Radio Islam they were hosting religious leaders from many faiths and philosophies: a Buddhist, a Christian Priest, a Rabbi and a Sikh. Mainly they were asking in this month of reflection how other faiths saw mercy, the main focus of the first ten days of Ramadan. The language from the other leaders was slightly different. The Buddhist leader translated mercy as compassion, the Christian as forgiveness. It was interesting to listen to, even if women were conspicuous by their absence... used to that in a religious arena... but mostly it was as we all are, a human connection with what is familiar, and a strong desire to believe in the human capacity for love. Let’s face it, our longevity relies upon that capacity when we need: we rely on love and the capacity of those around us to feel it. Why would we not nurture that above division, fear and anger?

We search and search, we continue to search for something that we have a massive and innate capacity for and we fail and fail again to see that the love we have for ourselves is extendable, that the love we have for ourselves needs only to be extended.



‘He who goes for seven nights without dreaming deserves to be called wicked.’ Talmud.



The Talmud recognises forty types of manual labour, minus one: To sow, to plough, to reap, to bind, to thresh, to winnow, to sift, to grind, to bolt, to knead, to bake, to shear, to wash, to comb, to dye, to spin, to warp, to shoot, to weave, to cut, to tie, to untie, to sew, to tear, to hunt, to kill, to skin, to salt, to singe, to tan, to cut, to write, to erase, to build, to pull down, to snuff out, to fire, to smite, to carry.



‘Of the twelve hours there are to the day, God divides his time thus: Three hours he spends in study of the Torah. Three hours he spends administering justice. Three hours spends in feeding the hungry, and three hours he spends at play with the whales.’ Talmud.



‘Nothing which was being done, no matter how stupid, no matter how many people knew and foretold the consequences, could be undone or prevented. Every event had the finality of a last judgement, a judgement that was passed neither by God nor by the devil, but looked rather like the expression of some unredeemably stupid fatality.’

Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism.



What about Wales?: Stirring the Dormant Dragon. While Welsh national institutions grow in competence and power, Welsh media is in decline to an extent that endangers our democracy, in this article by Gemma Annwyn published on TheButterflyRebellion.Scot.



‘The mob is primarily a group in which the residue of all classes are represented. This makes it so easy to mistake the mob for the people, which also comprises all strata of society. While the people in all great revolutions fight for true representation, the mob always will shout for the “strong man,” the “great leader.” For the mob hates society from which it is excluded, as well as Parliament where it is not represented. Plebiscites, therefore, with which modern mob leaders have obtained such excellent results, are an old concept of politicians who rely upon the mob.’

Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism.



‘Can you imagine any other nation where the head of government could make a speech to the UN, and the state broadcaster not even mention it?’

@simon_brooke on Twitter



According to a report by Berenberg Bank, Brexit offers no significant economic advantages to Britain in the long term. Its relatively small economy, compared with China, the U.S., and the E.U., would be a disadvantage when negotiating trade deals, as would further deregulation of the most lightly regulated developed economy in the world.

Business Insider



fascist dictatorship unelected bureaucrats won the health and lost the safety criminals have more rights than peace pounds and ounces tvs in cells wont stand for it for the queen the variety show the speech white christmas white minority snowflakes liberals and proud salt of the earth salt and vinegar hangings too good for a clip round the ear a fag in the john and a job at sixteen not like in my kids learned pakis showed respect no lip no cheek of the best is great is full and tadpoles frogs krauts ruskies in a jar the ira the scots the welsh and too many graduates a proper pint and a smoke in the coat and no knickers and a matinee for a shilling so-called bring back throw away gone to the cane the key the dogs the noose too good for traitors muslims jews justice not that im good old fashioned british at the end of a rope



One night, when Carwyn Jones was really blind drunk on imported potcheen, Ieuan Wyn Jones had to phone him up and talk him out of declaring the Welsh republic straight away. He wanted to wear his bandoliers, and everything.



‘I say once again that the British people have spoken. They have spoken on nationhood; they have spoken on unity; they have spoken on law and on public morality, and we will tolerate no argument, no dissent. And to anyone who would question the will of the people I say this: if you will not have British democracy, you must have the authority of the British state; if you will not accept the result of the Referendum on National Unity and Greatness, then you must obey the orders of the Emergency Committee. And if you will submit to neither the people nor the state, then you are guilty of crimes against the state and against the people, and on those crimes we show no mercy.’

Theresa May, Pronouncements under the Emergency Powers Act, vol. i, p. 17.



‘We do not call ourselves nationalists. Rather, we consider ourselves to be unionists, for what we celebrate and protect is the unity of the British nation, invincible because indivisible. Therefore, we no longer speak of the Welsh language, of Scottish democracy, of the Irish peace process, but rather, of the British armed forces, the British state, and the British language, binding our people together, and to us, throughout the four counties of Britain.’

Theresa May, Pronouncements under the Emergency Powers Act, vol. ii, p. 9.



‘We hope to reach again a Europe united but purged of the slavery of ancient, classical times — a Europe in which men will be proud to say, “I am a European.” We hope to see a Europe where men of every country will think as much of being a European as of belonging to their native land, and that without losing any of their love and loyalty of their birthplace. We hope wherever they go in this wide domain, to which we set no limits in the European Continent, they will truly feel, “Here I am at home. I am a citizen of this country too.”’

Winston Churchill, Amsterdam, 9th May 1948



My only objection to living in York would be that York is not in Wales, which would hinder my pursuit of my political goals. But once I have achieved my political goals, York will be in Wales.



One of UKIP’s finer minds, David Rowlands AM, explaining to the Senedd why the lies told by the Leave campaign were morally acceptable. Posted by Plaid Cymru on Facebook.



Poster for Dangerous Asylums reading in Aberystwyth


READING AND DISCUSSION
Friday 3rd February
7.30pm, Morlan Arts Centre, Aberystwyth

Dangerous Asylums: Stories from Denbigh Mental Hospital Told by Leading Welsh Writers

Glenda Beagan, Carys Bray, A. L. Reynolds, Manon Steffan Ros, Simon Thirsk, Elaine Walker, Gee and David Williams.
Contributing editor: Rob Mimpriss

Published by North Wales Mental Health Research Project, Department of Psychological Medicine, Hergest Unit, Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor

‘In this exemplary collaboration between medical science and imagination, lives preserved in official records, in the language and diagnoses of their times, are restored not just to light, but to humanity and equality. This anthology is a resurrection.’ Philip Gross.



This 10,000 lux daylight lamp, designed to counteract seasonal depression, will not significantly delay the eventual heat death of the universe, or the inevitable extinction of the human race.



Alarmed by warnings in the UK press that the oceans would freeze, the earth become a snowball, and humanity's last pitiful survivors be confined to a single nuclear-powered train, ever circling the earth to remain in summer, I prepared myself by turning the storage heater in my bedroom up to 2 last night, and filling a hot water bottle. My precautions proved adequate.



Wales ranks alongside Portugal and the Eastern European states in terms of prosperity according to this image from Eurogeographics: suggestive both of the failure of eight hundred of British union, of Wales’s reliance on E.U. trade, and of our potential as an independent nation.

Link

Figures taken from StatsCymru, shown in this image by Dafydd Elfryn, depict Wales’s export surplus and dependence on trade with the E.U., now threatened by Theresa May’s Hard Brexit. Meanwhile a petition by Plaid Cymru calls on Theresa May to keep Wales in the Single Market.



‘John Redwood — ah, there’s a name that brings back memories — argued yesterday (just before the new appointee was named) that the new ambassador should be someone who thinks that Brexit is “straightforward.” Now, there do seem to be a lot of those to choose from, but given the complexities already identified, I wouldn’t want to put anyone with such a simplistic viewpoint anywhere near the negotiations, purely on the pragmatic basis that they’re unlikely to understand most of what’s being discussed.

‘The Brexiteers’ approach to negotiation seems to be falling increasingly into the traditional British way of dealing with foreigners — speak to them slowly and loudly until they do what we want. The strange thing, to me, is that they seriously seem to believe that it will work.’

John Dixon, blogging with his customary courtesy and devastating restraint at Borthlas



This year
2016 2015 2014 2013

I am the author of three short story collections. Reasoning and For His Warriors, originally published by Gwasg y Bwthyn, Caernarfon, with Welsh Books Council support, now join Prayer at the End in revised editions at Cockatrice Books. My anthology of fiction, Dangerous Asylums: Stories from Denbigh Mental Hospital Told by Leading Welsh Writers, including work by Gee and David Williams, Glenda Beagan, Carys Bray, Simon Thirsk and others, was published by the North Wales Mental Health Research Project, October 2016.

I am the translator of Going South: The Stories of Richard Hughes Williams (Cockatrice, 2015), Hallowe’en in the Cwm: The Stories of Glasynys (Cockatrice, forthcoming), and A Book of Three Birds, the seventeenth-century classic by Morgan Llwyd (Cockatrice, forthcoming). In addition, I have translated fiction by D. Gwenallt Jones, Angharad Tomos, and Manon Steffan Ros.