‘Where is the Welsh short story going? Wherever Rob Mimpriss takes it.’ John O’Donoghue. Pugnacious Little Trolls, a new collection of short stories published by Cockatrice Books. ‘bathed in white fire in every sense... Borges would happily own them.’ Gee Williams on Pugnacious Little Trolls, a new collection of short stories published by Cockatrice Books. ‘a work of great beauty and subtle force… a fine, distinctive voice.’ Jim Perrin on Pugnacious Little Trolls, a new collection of short stories published by Cockatrice Books. Books: Fiction. ‘Dark, complex, pensively eloquent’ (Sophie Baggott, New Welsh Review) — Reasoning, For His Warriors and Prayer at the End, three short-story collections now published by Cockatrice Books. 10th May 2021: Following Richard Suchorzewski’s vow to ‘return to terrify’ the functional parties of Wales, I would like to announce that I will return to terrify the Nobel Prize for Literature committee. Books: Fiction. ‘Heaving with loss, regret and familial bonds.’ Annexe Magazine on ‘Gemini,’ a short story in Prayer at the End, published by Cockatrice Books. Books: Translations. ‘Lucid, skilful, and above all, of enormous timely relevance’ (Jim Perrin). Rob Mimpriss’s new translation of Morgan Llwyd’s allegorical masterpiece, A Book of Three Birds. ‘There is nothing ostentatious about his writing: most of his characters lead unremarkable, even humdrum, lives; there are few dramatic plot developments... And yet the best of these pieces express something important...’ Brian George, The Short Review. ‘These stories are a rare kind of joy. Even when they approach moments of discontent and danger they bring an optimism founded in human relationships. This is a wonderful collection.’ Prof. Graëme Harper, editor, New Writing. Books: Translations. ‘An invaluable translation.’ Angharad Price on Hallowe’en in the Cwm, the short stories of Glasynys, translated by Rob Mimpriss. ‘Humour and pity often arise from the characters’ inability to understand themselves and those close to them. In suggesting the truth and the self-deception Mimpriss not only engages our sympathy but makes us question our assumptions about ourselves.’ Caroline Clark, gwales.com ‘Quietly written, contemplative... whose powerhouse is the depth of its moral reflection.’ Siân Preece, Rhys Davies Competition on ‘Hamilton Park,’ published in Prayer at the End. ‘an immaculate collection.’ Nigel Jarrett, twice winner of the Rhys Davies Award, on Prayer at the End, a collection of short stories by Rob Mimpriss published by Cockatrice Books. ‘Through the stealthy movements of his prose, Rob Mimpriss enacts the quiet enigma of people’s lives and relationships. The result is an understated fiction of compelling intensity.’ Prof M Wynn Thomas. The story is called ‘Valiant’ in the collection, For His Warriors. I recommend it. Highly. It feels to me already like a classic.’ Fiona Owen, editor, Scintilla. A quiet writer with a loud voice... I’ll be listening for more.’ Michael Nobbs, gwales.com on Reasoning: Twenty Stories, published by Cockatrice Books. Books: Fiction. ‘In the most seemingly unremarkable of Rob Mimpriss’s pieces there is a skill, and a mystery and elusiveness to that skill, which other short-story writers might envy.’ Gee Williams. Books: Anthologies. ‘Industry in the Country of the Blind,’ new fiction in Land of Change, radical prose from Wales edited by Gemma Howell and forthcoming from Culture Matters. Books: Anthologies: ‘this exemplary collaboration’ (Philip Gross). Dangerous Asylums, an anthology of fiction by leading Welsh writers, inspired by Denbigh Mental Hospital, edited by Rob Mimpriss.

Image of Viktor Frankl

Hope, Despair and the 2019 General Election

13th December 2019: According to the concentration camp survivor and philosopher, Viktor Frankl,(1) those who went to the concentration camps are divided, not between those who survived the camps and those who died, but between those who allowed their suffering to make them meaner, more selfish, and more cruel, and those who forced their suffering to make them kinder and nobler. While some of the prisoners turned to thieving, taking other prisoners’ rations to eke out their own starvation for a few more days or weeks, or accepted the petty offices of the kapo or the prison police, others comforted their fellow prisoners and gave away their own bread, and these are described by the humanist and existentialist Frankl in almost religious terms, as ‘martyrs.’ These martyrs, even those that died, possessed the true gift of life, because their fear of suffering and death could not destroy their hope.

For the existentialist theologian, Paul Tillich,(2) our hope of pleasant times, of effortless social progress, of easy victories over nastiness and stupidity, of a life whose value and meaning are affirmed by external events, are distractions from the courage to live and the faith that life is worth living. For Paul Tillich, like Viktor Frankl, those who affirm the value of life, even though it contains suffering and ends in death, possess ‘absolute faith,’ and this absolute faith is a better thing even than the religious belief that the self will be perpetuated beyond the grave. We are capable of fear, death and despair, says Tillich, but only while we are alive, and this shows that life, and the courage to live, are more real than the fear or despair which erode them, or the death which will end them, and more meaningful.

I write this after the re-election of a government whose ‘punitive, mean-spirited and often callous‘ austerity policies have inflicted ‘great misery’ upon the poor,(3) and have contributed to the deaths of 130,000 people(4), and who will use this victory to pursue an unpopular isolationist policy which they know will cause more suffering to their people. After such a defeat, and to such heartless and morally worthless opponents, it becomes vital that we take heart. Hope says ‘I am going to carry on living’ and ‘I am going to carry on fighting.’ It does not need any outcome but that.

  1. Viktor Frankl, Man’s Search For Meaning: The classic tribute to hope from the Holocaust. Harmondsworth: Rider, 2004.
  2. Paul Tillich, The Courage to Be. London: Fontana, 1962.
  3. Philip Alston, ‘Statement on Visit to the United Kingdom, by Professor Philip Alston, United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights.’ United Nations Human Rights: Office of the High Commissioner, 16th November 2018.
  4. Toby Helm, ‘Austerity to blame for 130,000 “preventable” UK deaths – report.’ The Observer, 1st June 2019.

I am the author of four short story collections. Reasoning and For His Warriors, originally published by Gwasg y Bwthyn, Caernarfon, with Welsh Books Council support, now join Prayer at the End and Pugnacious Little Trolls in revised editions at Cockatrice Books. My anthology of fiction, Dangerous Asylums, including work by Gee and David Williams, Glenda Beagan, Carys Bray, Simon Thirsk and others, was published by the North Wales Mental Health Research Project, October 2016. I am a contributor with Nigel Jarrett, Rachel Trezise, Tristan Hughes and others to Brush with Fate, an anthology of Welsh fiction translated by Hala Salah Eldin, and to Land of Change, an anthology of radical writing forthcoming from Culture Matters. My work has appeared in Albawtaka Review, Annexe Magazine, Blue Tattoo, Cambrensis, Catharsis, East of the Web, The Harbinger, The Interpreter’s House, New Welsh Review, New Writing, Otherwise Engaged, The Swansea Review, Tears in the Fence, Writing in Education, and elsewhere. I hold a Ph.D. in Creative and Critical Writing, and am former Artistic Coordinator of the North Wales Mental Health Research Project convened by the Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board. In 2011 I was elected to membership of the Welsh Academy in recognition of my contributions to Welsh writing.

I am the translator of Going South: The Stories of Richard Hughes Williams (Cockatrice, 2015), Hallowe’en in the Cwm: The Stories of Glasynys (Cockatrice, 2017), and A Book of Three Birds, the seventeenth-century classic by Morgan Llwyd (Cockatrice, 2017). In addition, I have translated fiction by D. Gwenallt Jones, Angharad Tomos, and Manon Steffan Ros.